By Ian Crow

Welcome to your most recent review of the latest Marvel movie. This time, I’ll be reviewing Venom; Sony Pictures attempt to create a whole new Marvel universe which isn’t attached to the already successful and much-loved MCU. However, there are questions we all are asking, firstly, what could possibly go wrong? Some may say a lot. Secondly, did anybody actually ask for this instalment? Anyone? Seriously, I am calling friends and family as I type and none of them asked for it…well did you? With that in mind let’s proceed on to analysing Venom in all its non-MCU glory.

As a result of Sony Pictures going out on their own accord this means Venoms main nemesis, namely Spider-Man, is out of the picture paving way to the doubt of whether this film can actually work.
In this reboot of Venom, Tom Hardy, admittedly one of my favourite actors, plays Eddie Brock. Eddie is an investigative journalist making headlines with breaking news stories on sensitive and controversial topics. In one particular headline he is chasing the story of inhumane and illegal deaths of humans in Carlton Drake’s (Riz Ahmed) lab.  Whilst investigating this story he runs into hot water; with the uproar from his reports a series of unfortunate events eventually leading him to the laboratory itself and the presence of symbiotes. One powerful symbiote, unbeknown to anyone, is loose and proceeds to latch on to Eddie thus creating the unstoppable force known as Venom.

When you read that back, it doesn’t sound half bad. It’s got the traditional set pieces of a Superhero movie. Weird genetical changes made to a human from an unknown source, lab experiments, an unsuspecting and general innocent individual, you name it. However, there is a big ‘but’ coming; whilst it has some of the traits of creating a good comic book movie, it does fall short and leaves the taste of bitter disappointment. Having been teased into believing Venom, as rated a 15 and detached from MCU, would have more action much like the ever-loved Deadpool, I had hopes it would be just as successful being free from the chains of Disney Marvel.

Instead Venom just provided a film still restrained yet restrained by its own doing, not making use of the freedom it has been honoured; no violence, entertainment or excitement comes from it.. Even Tom Hardy seems to struggle, staggering his way throughout, acting as though it’s his first time attempting comedy and desperately failing to receive even a chuckle. It is a painful watch, instead of understanding his interpretation of the character I spent the whole film just trying to decipher what exactly he was trying to achieve in his interpretation. Being fair to Tom Hardy, he isn’t the only person to cop out and bag a large amount of money for a lacklustre performance, the usually brilliant Michelle Williams and Riz Ahmed gave performances of much the same speed.

Venom is known to cling on to a host and feeding off that person. In this iteration of the Marvel anti-hero, Venom is feeding off of three shoddy performances that leave the symbiote in a very precarious position. A whole lot is going to need to be done in order to bring Venom back from this disaster of a film. I am both angry and disappointed that they’ve managed to create such a mediocre and lacklustre film from one of the most riveting characters in the Marvel universe.. It is difficult to fathom how they managed to do such a bad job; surely it would be harder to make this character boring than enjoyable, yet this is what they seemingly achieved. There were some moments considered acceptable, seeing it one time isn’t a disaster but seeing it more than once may lead to some judgment on my part. I wish I was more excited to see Venom on the big screen but it is in my opinion that Venom will struggle to survive on the big screen without the depth that Spider-Man brings.

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